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cjwho:

La Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain by Antoni Gaudi

Construction of the Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família began in 1882, more than a century ago. The temple is still under construction, with completion expected in 2026. It is perhaps the best known structure of Catalan Modernisme, drawing over three million visitors annually. Architect Antoni Gaudi worked on the project until his death in 1926, in full anticipation he would not live to see it finished.

Gaudi was appointed architect in 1883 at 31 years of age, following disagreements between the temple’s promoters and the original architect, Francisco de Paula del Villar y Lozano. He maintained del Villar’s Latin cross plan, typical of Gothic cathedrals, but departed from the Gothic in several significant ways. Most notably, Gaudi developed a system of angled columns and hyperboloidal vaults to eliminate the need for flying buttresses. Rather than relying on exterior elements, horizontal loads are transferred through columns on the interior.

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I love crazy buildings, man. I just love them. I sadly didn’t get the chance to visit Spain while I was in Europe, but maybe one of these days I’ll get there.

I just have so much bucket list, though. So much.

Suggested by a non-Tumblr friend.

Photoset

sandepantalones:

Art History Snapchats 

(via theartificialintelligentsia)

Link

iquantny:

While walking around NYC, I invariable pass fast food restaurants in many neighborhoods. It’s inevitable. And when it comes to fast food, different people have varying reactions to these establishments. Some are fans, others stay far away.

One curiosity that is common in NYC is the fast food…

Tags: nyc restaurant
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lecteurdepaumes:

God bless
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Mariposa, Alexander Calder, 1951; hangs out (ha ha did you see what I did there) at a Neiman Marcus branch.
On Calder’s work:

Alexander Calder revolutionized the art of sculpture by making movement one of its main components. Yet his invention of the “mobile” — a word coined in 1931 by artist Marcel Duchamp to designate Calder’s moving sculpture — was only one of Calder’s achievements. In his early wire figures and in his “stabiles,” static sculptures in sheet metal, Calder created innovative works by exploring the aesthetic possibilities of untraditional materials. As a major contribution to the development of abstract art, Calder’s stabiles and mobiles challenged the prevailing notion of sculpture as a composition of masses and volumes by proposing a new definition based on the ideas of open space and transparency. With the giant stabiles of the latter part of his career, Calder launched a new type of public sculpture — one which proved so successful that many of these works have become landmarks in cities around the globe.

(Image source here. Suggested by kasuchi.)

Mariposa, Alexander Calder, 1951; hangs out (ha ha did you see what I did there) at a Neiman Marcus branch.

On Calder’s work:

Alexander Calder revolutionized the art of sculpture by making movement one of its main components. Yet his invention of the “mobile” — a word coined in 1931 by artist Marcel Duchamp to designate Calder’s moving sculpture — was only one of Calder’s achievements. In his early wire figures and in his “stabiles,” static sculptures in sheet metal, Calder created innovative works by exploring the aesthetic possibilities of untraditional materials. As a major contribution to the development of abstract art, Calder’s stabiles and mobiles challenged the prevailing notion of sculpture as a composition of masses and volumes by proposing a new definition based on the ideas of open space and transparency. With the giant stabiles of the latter part of his career, Calder launched a new type of public sculpture — one which proved so successful that many of these works have become landmarks in cities around the globe.

(Image source here. Suggested by kasuchi.)

Quote
"MEDEA : Let no one think of me that I am humble or weak or passive; let them understand I am of a different kind: dangerous to my enemies, loyal to my friends. To such a life glory belongs."

Euripides, Medea  (via facina-oris)

No joke, this was an actual conversation that happened today, wintersoldierfell:

@medeasdragons: what kind of a supervillain would I be

thisoneiscarl: Medea.

I was immensely flattered.

(Source: camilla-macauley, via wintersoldierfell)

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In case you want to feel really upset today about inefficiencies in the legal system and solitary confinement policy…

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Oh, that’s easy.
Grow your hair out, braid it and then play a regular game of civ.
Declare war on civilizations based on whether or not you like them.
Have multiple small armies, rather than one big one, and never let your Great Generals be within ten tiles of one another.
Whenever you meet a female leader of another civilization, make it your primary goal to ally with her, except for Catherine, because she’s undoubtedly Graendal.
Don’t ever share intrigue with another player, no matter how much sense it would make to do so.
You may not use any Great Writer abilities until you have four of them, and then you must use all of them simultaneously.
Occasionally, slap yourself and then convince yourself that you deserved it.
Once every ten turns, tug on your braid.
Congratulations! You are now playing Civ, Wheel of Time style!

Link courtesy of thisoneiscarl.

Oh, that’s easy.

Grow your hair out, braid it and then play a regular game of civ.

Declare war on civilizations based on whether or not you like them.

Have multiple small armies, rather than one big one, and never let your Great Generals be within ten tiles of one another.

Whenever you meet a female leader of another civilization, make it your primary goal to ally with her, except for Catherine, because she’s undoubtedly Graendal.

Don’t ever share intrigue with another player, no matter how much sense it would make to do so.

You may not use any Great Writer abilities until you have four of them, and then you must use all of them simultaneously.

Occasionally, slap yourself and then convince yourself that you deserved it.

Once every ten turns, tug on your braid.

Congratulations! You are now playing Civ, Wheel of Time style!

Link courtesy of thisoneiscarl.

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Posting this chart (from the Vox article “The Anger Behind the Hong Kong Uprising, in One Chart”) because I was struck by the similarity between this chart and other accounts of public and elite opinion about China in neighboring countries over time.

Posting this chart (from the Vox article “The Anger Behind the Hong Kong Uprising, in One Chart”) because I was struck by the similarity between this chart and other accounts of public and elite opinion about China in neighboring countries over time.

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nyplbehindthestacks:

In 1897, a competition was held for the design of the New York Public Library.  The Library’s Trustees decided to hold two separate competitions; one for local, lesser-known architects of the greater New York City area, and another invitational competition for established architects.  The winners of the first phase were judged against the invitees of the second.  The response to the open competition was tremendous, with eighty-eight library design plans entered by the July 15, 1897 deadline.  The winners turned out to be the youngest and least experienced of the invited architects, John Merven Carrère and Thomas Hastings. 

The New York Public Library, a NYC institution and one that hosted me for half a day recently when I was waiting around to pick up a travel visa. Facts about the library from the library website:

On opening day in 1911, the first book requested from the main stacks was Delia Bacon’s Philosophy of the Plays of Shakespeare Unfolded.  The book, much to the staff’s chagrin, was not in the catalog and a staff member donated the book two days later.  Fifty years later it was discovered that the interchange had been a setup; the staff member had hoped to generate publicity for the book. The first book to actually be delivered from the main stacks, a speedy seven minutes after the call slip was deposited, was Nravstvennye idealy nashego vremeni (Moral ideas of our time: Friedrich Nietzsche and Leo Tolstoy) by Nikolai I. Grot.
The marble floors of the Library were deemed so hard that in 1911 all employees were supplied with rubber soled shoes.  The O’Sullivan Company quickly exploited the fact and placed advertisements urging consumers to visit the Library, where the employees used the company’s heels.
Espionage at the Library! Whittaker Chambers, Alger Hiss’s accuser, was an NYPL employee (1923-27) whose conversion to Communism was the result of a meeting with a party member in the Library. He was dismissed from the Library for stealing books.

I never actually got the “Between the Lions” joke that was the title of that one PBS show until I was like 21.
Suggested by lonefiresthename.

nyplbehindthestacks:

In 1897, a competition was held for the design of the New York Public Library.  The Library’s Trustees decided to hold two separate competitions; one for local, lesser-known architects of the greater New York City area, and another invitational competition for established architects.  The winners of the first phase were judged against the invitees of the second.  The response to the open competition was tremendous, with eighty-eight library design plans entered by the July 15, 1897 deadline.  The winners turned out to be the youngest and least experienced of the invited architects, John Merven Carrère and Thomas Hastings. 

The New York Public Library, a NYC institution and one that hosted me for half a day recently when I was waiting around to pick up a travel visa. Facts about the library from the library website:

  • On opening day in 1911, the first book requested from the main stacks was Delia Bacon’s Philosophy of the Plays of Shakespeare Unfolded.  The book, much to the staff’s chagrin, was not in the catalog and a staff member donated the book two days later.  Fifty years later it was discovered that the interchange had been a setup; the staff member had hoped to generate publicity for the book. The first book to actually be delivered from the main stacks, a speedy seven minutes after the call slip was deposited, was Nravstvennye idealy nashego vremeni (Moral ideas of our time: Friedrich Nietzsche and Leo Tolstoy) by Nikolai I. Grot.
  • The marble floors of the Library were deemed so hard that in 1911 all employees were supplied with rubber soled shoes.  The O’Sullivan Company quickly exploited the fact and placed advertisements urging consumers to visit the Library, where the employees used the company’s heels.
  • Espionage at the Library! Whittaker Chambers, Alger Hiss’s accuser, was an NYPL employee (1923-27) whose conversion to Communism was the result of a meeting with a party member in the Library. He was dismissed from the Library for stealing books.

I never actually got the “Between the Lions” joke that was the title of that one PBS show until I was like 21.

Suggested by lonefiresthename.